Essay about chinese new year 2012

The Chinese New Year Is Representative Of Chinese Culture
Contents:
  1. Chinese New Year
  2. Chinese New Year Celebrated in the Philippines | Asia Society
  3. What's New?
  4. Chinese New Year in Malaysia - All You Need To Know
  5. Dates of Chinese New Year by year

Chinese New Year

After facing hostility from the local people, they decided to hold a parade in order to showcase their culture and tradition to the localities. Ever since, the day is celebrated with a street parade in San Francisco. Chinese New Year is celebrated in different ways in different parts of the world.


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The predominant color in all the celebrations of this day is red. According to tradition, red envelopes containing money are given by the elderly to the young. The money contained in these red envelopes is always even, which is determined by the left-most digit than the right-most one.

牛欣欣 - Chinese New Year Song 2012

The red envelopes are symbolic of staving off evil and bringing in good luck. People exchange gifts and light firecrackers on this day. Other traditions associated with this day include hanging of the Fu symbol on the main door of the house which is supposed to bring good luck and wearing red color clothes.


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Dragon and Lion dances are also very popular during Chinese New Year. Chinese New Year Calendar. Chinese New Year Weekend. It is a day holiday, beginning on the first day of a new moon and ending with the full moon on the day of the Lantern Festival. The Chinese calendar is based on the lunar year, so the date of Chinese New Year changes every year. The Chinese calendar follows a year pattern with each year named after an animal. There are various stories which explain this. The simplest is that Buddha or the Jade Emperor invited all of the animals to join him for a New Year celebration, but only 12 animals turned up.

Find another version of the story to print, below. Depending on the year you are born, you are believed to have the various character traits of that year's animal.


  • When is Chinese New Year in 2012?!
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  • New York Philharmonic’s Chinese New Year Gala - The New York Times;
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Learn more about Chinese New Year and explore some of symbolism and traditions of the holiday and celebrations Learn about Chinese New Year. How did the Chinese years get their names? Read online, print and read later, listen to our audio version, and enjoy some colouring and writing activities too! The Story of the Chinese Zodiac.

Chinese New Year Celebrated in the Philippines | Asia Society

Pandas come from China and we've got some great panda printables, colouring pages and crafts which the kids can enjoy! The Chinese regard goldfish as very lucky, particulary at Chinese New Year. Why not explore our collection of goldfish resources? We've added lots new this year. Take the opportunity to learn a little about China, Chinese customs, classic Chinese stories and folk tales and more Write your own Chinese restaurant menu Why does an embarrassed panda get mistaken for a newspaper?

What's New?

Because they're both black and white and red all over! The girls will want some flowers new; The boys will want firecrackers, too. A new felt cap will please papa And a sugar cake for dear mama. Become a Member to access 35, printables! Skip to main content.

Chinese New Year in Malaysia - All You Need To Know

Kung Hei Fat Choy! What is Chinese New Year? Find another version of the story to print, below Depending on the year you are born, you are believed to have the various character traits of that year's animal. Year of the Pig.

Divers perform a dragon dance during an event to celebrate the Chinese Lunar New Year at the Shanghai aquarium, on January 19, Amateur artists perform a fire show to celebrate the Chinese new year in Russia's Siberian city of Krasnoyarsk, on January 22, A Chinese man attaches a blessing tablet with his wishes for the new year on the first day of the "Year of the Dragon", at the Dongyue Temple in Beijing, on January 23, A performer dressed in traditional costume and wearing makeup drinks tea as he and others prepare to take part in Chinese new year celebrations at the year-old Dongyue Temple in Beijing, on January 23, The temple is the largest of its kind in northern China for the Zhengyi school of Taoism, and was originally built by Taoist monks in the 14th century.

Pedestrians cross the road near a dragon decoration installed for the Lunar New Year in Singapore, on January 16, Kelly Hoang and her son Scott Hoang play with sparklers outside a temple in Chinatown, on January 22, in Singapore.

Dates of Chinese New Year by year

Thousands of people converged on Chinatown to usher in the Year of the Water Dragon. Decorative red lanterns are hung on trees at a temple fair to celebrate the Lunar New Year of Dragon, on January 22, in Beijing, China.

The Chinese year that began in January 2012 gives a powerful opportunity to witness.

Visitors walk past dragon-shaped lanterns set up for the upcoming Spring Festival in Xi'an, Shaanxi province, on January 16, Temple fair performers with cartoon-dragon-shaped balloon costumes rehearse for upcoming Chinese Lunar New Year, the year of the dragon, near a roadside decoration showing Chinese character "spring" in Beijing, China, on January 22, The parade featured illuminated floats accompanied by local and international performing groups which entertained both locals and tourists alike on Chinese Lunar New Year.

A Chinese woman lights joss sticks to pray for prosperity and well being on the first day of the "Year of the Dragon", at the Dongyue Temple in Beijing, on January 23, We want to hear what you think about this article.