Radical plasticity thesis

Contents:
  1. Crossings and Transfers in Contemporary Anglo-American Thought.
  2. Thesis of Radical Plasticity & mystery of a man living with 90% of his brain missing
  3. Consciousness; The Radical Plasticity Thesis: How the Brain Learns to be Conscious : philosophy

Crossings and Transfers in Contemporary Anglo-American Thought.

As Olivia Goldhill reports for Quartz :. In other words, unlike a thermostat that simply records temperature, conscious humans both know and care that they know. Cleeremans claims that the brain is continually and unconsciously learning to re-describe its own activity to itself, and these descriptions form the basis of conscious experience.


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But what does all that have to do with a man surviving with only 10 percent of his brain? According to Cleeremans, even though his remaining brain was only tiny, the neurons left over were able to still generate a theory about themselves, which means the man remained conscious of his actions. In itself, the concept isn't new - we're discovering more and more each day just how flexible and adaptable our brains really are.

Just this week, scientists were able to trigger brain cells to start growing again in order to restore vision in blind mice.

Thesis of Radical Plasticity & mystery of a man living with 90% of his brain missing

But it's a striking reminder of what our brains can learn to achieve, even when they're incredibly damaged, and provides hope that we might one day learn how to reverse some of the illnesses that cause neurodegeneration. Rather than 90 percent of this man's brain being missing, it's more likely that it's simply been compressed into the thin layer you can see in the images above. References Publications referenced by this paper. Predictions: a universal principle in the operation of the human brain.

Moshe Bar. Subjective measures of unconscious knowledge. Zoltan Dienes. Towards a cognitive neuroscience of consciousness: basic evidence and a workspace framework Stanislas Dehaene , Lionel Naccache. Horacio Fabrega.

Plasticity

A cognitive theory of consciousness Bernard J. Related Papers.

By this account, the brain continuously and unconsciously learns to redescribe its own activity to itself, so developing systems of metarepresentations that characterize and qualify their target representations. Such redescriptions form the basis of conscious experience, and also subtend successful control of action.


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In a sense thus, this is the enactive perspective, but turned both inwards and further outwards. Crucially, these properties accrue as a result of learning and plasticity processes, which are in turn viewed as mandatory processes that always accompany information processing.

Consciousness; The Radical Plasticity Thesis: How the Brain Learns to be Conscious : philosophy

Thus, the core idea is that a cognitive system becomes a conscious cognitive system in virtue of its ability to continuously learn to represent and hence, predict the consequences of its own activity. To explore this hypothesis, we propose a research program that leverages the methods of cognitive psychology, of cognitive neuroscience, and of computational modeling to jointly address four key hypotheses: 1 Consciousness depends on quality of representation, 2 Consciousness depends on metarepresentations, 3 Consciousness depends on theory of mind, and 4 Consciousness depends on learning.

The overarching goal of the project is to characterize the computational principles that differentiate conscious from unconscious cognition, based on a bold, original, and innovative theory about the role that neural plasticity and learning play in consciousness.